Exchange 2010 SP2 Address Book Policies

In Exchange 2010 a new feature will be available called Address Book Policies which makes it possible to use multiple Address Books in Exchange 2010, completely separated from each other. It is sometimes referred to as multi-tenancy for Exchange 2010 although this is not entirely true. In this article I’d like to explain a bit more.

Address List Segregation

For Exchange 2007 Microsoft has a whitepaper available that describes how to implement Address List Segregation to achieve multiple Address Lists completely invisible for each other. In other words, users in the Contoso.com Address List don’t see other Address Lists and users, like the Fabrikam Address List or the Tailspintoys Address List. In Exchange 2007 this is implemented using Access Control Lists (ACL’s) to set permissions for specific Address Lists. This works fine for Exchange 2007 but Exchange 2010 uses a different technique called the Address Book Service running on the Client Access Server. Therefore, if using (or trying to use) the Address List Segregation whitepaper on Exchange 2010 things will horribly break. Continue reading Exchange 2010 SP2 Address Book Policies

SMTP load balancing with F5 LTM

In my previous blog I explained how to configure the F5 LTM for use with Exchange 2010 CAS servers. To do this properly it is recommended to use a template (iApp) because of the amount of work (and thus complexity).

Load balancing SMTP is much easier. The only things that need to be configured are:

  • Service Monitor for monitoring the SMTP service on the Exchange 2010 Hub Transport Servers;
  • A Pool containing the Exchange 2010 Hub Transport servers;
  • A VIP for the SMTP service with a listener on the public network.

To create a new Service Monitor select the Local Traffic and click the + symbol next to monitors. Give the new monitor a name like SMTP_Monitor and if needed adjust the service health monitoring interval. Continue reading SMTP load balancing with F5 LTM

Load Balancing Exchange 2010 with F5 LTM

In a earlier blogpost on load balancing Exchange 2010 I explained how to achieve this with a Kemp Loadmaster. In this blogpost I’d like to demonstrate how to configure this with an F5 Local Traffic Manager (LTM). This is actually part I of what I’ve demo’ d in the MEC 2012.

The configuration looks like this. There are two multi-role servers configured with a Database Availability Group (DAG). There’s a File Share Witness (FSW) configured on server FS01. The F5 itself is installed in a two arm configuration, so the VIP for the clients is on a different subnet then the Exchange Server.

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Continue reading Load Balancing Exchange 2010 with F5 LTM

How to brand OWA in Exchange 2013

Jeff Guillet wrote an excellent post on his EXPTA {blog} on how to brand the OWA logon page with the CAS server name which is perfect when testing load balancing solutions. You can find this post here: http://www.expta.com/2010/03/how-to-brand-owa-2007-and-2010-with.html. For testing OWA in Exchange 2013 the process in somewhat similar. On the Exchange 2013 Client Access server, navigate to the C:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\V15\FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa\auth directory and open the logon.aspx page with (for example) Notepad.

In this file, scroll down to the <div class=”logonContainer”> section and add the servername text just before the <div class=”signInInputLabel” id=”userNameLabel” aria-hidden=”true”> section.

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Save the file and in your browser navigate to the Exchange 2013 Client Access Server:

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I’m pretty sure this is not supported, and you’ll lose the changes after an upgrade, but for testing purposes it’s perfect.

Exchange 2010 SP3 on Windows Server 2012

Now that Exchange 2010 SP3 is available it’s also possible to install it on Windows Server 2012. Normally that’s not a problem, but you have to be careful with the prerequisite software. Windows Server 2012 comes with .NET Framework 4.5 and Management Framework 3.0 (including Powershell 3.0) but Exchange 2010 still requires .NET Framework 3.5 and Powershell 2.0. Luckily Powershell 2.0 and Powershell 3.0 can coexist on the same box with any issues.

Install .NET Framework 3.5 and Powershell 2.0

To install .NET Framework 3.5 (which automatically includes Powershell 2.0 on Windows Server 2012) you can use Server Manager, but there’s a little snag because Server Manager does not know where the install files are located:-) Continue reading Exchange 2010 SP3 on Windows Server 2012

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