Exchange 2013 CU14 Content Indexing failed

There have been reports about Exchange 2013 CU14 where Content Indexing failed. I’ve heard about CI failing for some Mailbox databases, Mailbox databases containing Public Folder Mailboxes, but also reports about Exchange 2013 Cu14 servers where CI fails for all Mailbox databases.

In the Event Viewer you can find error messages like:

Watson report about to be sent for process id: 28160, with parameters: E12IIS, c-RTL-AMD64, 15.00.1236.003, M.E.Search.Service, M.E.Data.Directory, M.E.D.D.ScopeSet.GetOrgWideDefaultScopeSet, System.ArgumentNullException, 301, 15.00.1236.000.
ErrorReportingEnabled: False

You can find an extended thread on the Microsoft forums as well: Exchnage 2013 CU 14 Database Indexing failed.

The issue is confirmed by Microsoft and Microsoft is working on a fix for this. At this moment it is unknown whether Microsoft will release an Interim Update (IU) or that it will be made available in CU15.

For now my recommendation would be to NOT INSTALL EXCHANGE 2013 CU14 at all.

Update October 27. If you unfortunately run into this issue after installing Exchange 2013 CU14 there’s no other solution then to install Exchange 2013 CU13 and move all your Mailboxes to this server. I cannot call this a fix or workaround, it’s an ugly fallback scenario.

ps. I’ve heard rumors that this issue also appears in Exchange 2016 CU3 but I cannot confirm if this is the case. If you are planning to deploy Exchange 2016 CU3 I would recommend to thoroughly test CU3 before putting it into production.

Resolve-DnsName PowerShell command

Every now and then you find these small little things that turn out to be very useful. The Resolve-DnsName cmdlet in PowerShell is such a brilliant thing, and it is a nice replacement for NSLOOKUP. Since it is a PowerShell cmdlet you can easily use it in scripts. It looks like this command was introduced in Windows Server 2012 R2, but I found out only a couple of days ago.

As an Exchange consultant I can use the Resolve-DnsName for retrieving my MX records, or my DMARC record:


Using the Get-Help Resolve-DnsName command you can get more information, if you need some examples on how to use it you can use the -Examples option, or the -Detailed and -Full options.


Very useful for an Exchange admin, and it can be used in PowerShell scripts.

ITDev Connections 2016 Las Vegas


From October 10 until October 13 the annual IT/Dev Connection was held in the Aria Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, for the 15th time this year.

IT/Dev Connection is a relatively small tech conference with approx. 1000 ~ 1250 attendees (my guess). Because of this size the event is very accessible, attendees can approach speakers, vendors and sponsors easily without being too crowded. It happens regularly that a speaker is walking through the hallway or having lunch at the venue, and it being approached by attendees, this makes an event like this much fun, both for speakers as well as attendees.

The event has a strong Microsoft technology focus although you can see some other sessions as well like sessions about Docker or Amazon Web Services for example. The good thing about this event is that it is an event about Microsoft technology, not organized by Microsoft and sessions are presented by non-Microsoft employees so you get plenty of real world scenarios instead of the marketing talk you typically get at Ignite. Even better, this year there weren’t even keynote sessions since they contain too much marketing blahblah J

Continue reading ITDev Connections 2016 Las Vegas

Rename filenames containing strange characters with PowerShell

Recently I had a computer with tons of file on it which I had to backup and upload to OneDrive for Business (OdfB). For some unknown reason there were lots of file that had the HTML representation of a space character in it (%20), there were also filenames containing a # character.

Needless to say, the OdfB client didn’t like it, and kept complaining about not being able to upload files, it wanted to try again and again…. Renaming these files (in hundreds of directories) was not something I fancied, but this is great for PowerShell to figure out.

To find all files that contained the %20 in it I used the following command:

Dir -Recurse | Where-Object {$_.Name -like "*%20*" }


Now it’s just a matter of renaming the “%20” with another character, for example an underscore character “_”, like this:

Dir -Recurse | Where-Object {$_.Name -like "*%20*" } | Rename-Item -NewName { $_.Name -replace "%20","_" }

Et voila, all “%20” characters are now removed from the filenames, and ready to be uploaded to OneDrive for Business


SenderID, SPF, DKIM and DMARC in Exchange 2016 – Part III

In the previous two blog posts I have discussed SPF and DKIM as a way of validating the authenticity of email messages. SPF is using an SPF record in public DNS where all legitimate outbound SMTP servers for a domain are listed. A receiving SMTP server can check this DNS record to make sure the sending mail server is allowed to send email messages on behalf of the user or his organization.

DKIM is about signing and verifying header information in email messages. A sending mail server can digitally sign messages, using a private key that’s only available to the sending mail server. The receiving mail server checks the public key in DNS to verify the signed information in the email message. Since the private key is only available to the sending organization’s mail servers, the receiving mail server knows that it’s a legitimate mail server, and thus a legitimate email message.

As a reminder, my test environment is configured as follows:


There’s an Exchange 2016 CU2 Mailbox server hosting several Mailboxes, and there’s an Exchange 2016 CU2 Edge Transport server. Using Edge Synchronization all inbound and outbound SMTP traffic is handled by the Edge Transport server.

In the previous two blog posts an SPF record was created and implemented, and DKIM including a DKIM signing module on the Edge Transport server was implemented and functioning correctly.

This last blog in a series of three discusses DMARC, which is built on top of SPF and DKIM. Continue reading SenderID, SPF, DKIM and DMARC in Exchange 2016 – Part III