Tag Archives: Upgrade

Exchange 2016 End of (mainstream) support

As you should (must) know, Exchange 2010 support will end this October. At that point, Microsoft will stop all support for Exchange 2010, including all security fixes. If you are still running Exchange 2010, you must act now and start moving to Exchange 2016 or to Office 365. For an Exchange 2010 to Office 365 migration I have written a couple of blogs before:

Moving from Exchange 2010 to Office 365.

Moving from Exchange 2010 to Office 365 Part II.

But what most people don’t realize is that Exchange 2016 mainstream support will also end this October. From that point forward, Exchange 2016 will be in extended support. This means no more Cumulative Updates and only Security Updates will be released when there updates are marked as ‘critical’.

Note. There’s no direct upgrade path from Exchange 2010 to Exchange 2019, so if you want to follow this route, you must move to Exchange 2016 first, followed by a migration to Exchange 2019.

If you move to Office 365 and have moved all your Mailboxes to Exchange Online, things are getting interesting. In this situation, you still need at least one Exchange server on-premises for management purposes. Microsoft supplies a free Exchange 2016 hybrid license for this situation (there is no free Exchange 2019 hybrid license!), and Microsoft is committed to support this configuration. At least until the moment a final solution is delivered by Microsoft to remove that last Exchange server from your on-premises organization. According to Microsoft, “this does not increase your risk profile in any way” as stated in their article “Exchange Server 2016 and End of Mainstream Support”.
If you still have mailboxes on-premises, the Microsoft recommendation is to move to Exchange 2019. Mainstream support for Exchange 2019 will end on January 1st, 2024, and extended support for Exchange 2019 will end on October 14, 2025 (this is the same date as end of extended support for Exchange 2016).

What to do

  1. If you are still on Exchange 2010, I would urge you to move to Exchange 2016 as soon as possible. Mainstream support for Exchange 2016 will stop this October, but according to Microsoft you are still safe since Security Updates will be released when needed. There’s no direct need to upgrade to Exchange 2019 at this moment, but this is something you must consider the upcoming time. I do know customers however that only want products that are in mainstream support, so if you are in this boat you must move to Exchange 2019 of course.
  2. If you are running Exchange 2013, you must start moving to Exchange 2019 anytime soon for optimal support and skip Exchange 2016.
  3. If you are in an Exchange 2016 hybrid scenario and all your mailboxes are in Exchange Online, you are safe to stay in this situation until Microsoft releases a final solution for that dreaded last Exchange server on-premises for management purposes.
  4. If you are in Exchange 2016 hybrid and you still have mailboxes on-premises, you must move this to Exchange 2019 hybrid to stay in a supported configuration. Please keep in mind that Microsoft only supports the version n-1 in a hybrid scenario, which means automatically Exchange 2019 after this October.

 

 

Azure AD Connect versions

Be honest, how often do you check the software versions on your Azure AD connect server? I have to admit, Exchange is not an issue, this is updated regularly, but Azure AD Connect is a different story. At the moment of writing my Azure AD Connect version is running 1.4.38.0 (installed on December 31, 2019 so more than 6 months ago) while version 1.5.30.0 is already available for some time now (source: Azure AD Connect: Version release history). And although Azure AD Connect supports auto upgrade (Check with the Get-ADSyncAutoUpgrade cmdlet), not all updates of Azure AD Connect support auto upgrade and thus need to be upgraded manually.

Azure AD Connect older versions

It is important to have a look at the versions of Azure AD Connect, I was bit surprised (but can totally understand) to read the following on the Microsoft site:

“Starting on November 1st, 2020, we will begin implementing a deprecation process whereby versions of Azure AD Connect that were released more than 18 months ago will be deprecated. At that time we will begin this process by deprecating all releases of Azure AD Connect with version 1.3.20.0 (which was released on 4/24/2019) and older, and we will proceed to evaluate the deprecation of older versions of Azure AD Connect every time a new version releases.”

You can download the latest versions of Azure AD Connect from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=47594. After starting the Azure AD Connect package, enter the global tenant admin credentials and follow the wizard.

Upgrade Azure AD Connect

The upgrade should be finished in a minute or two.

Starting with Azure AD Connect version 1.5.30.0 Microsoft implemented the Azure AD Connect sync V2 endpoint API (public preview) which will improve performance to Azure AD synchronization. You can enable the new endpoint using the following commands in a PowerShell window on the Azure AD Connect server (elevated permissions):

Set-ADSyncScheduler -SyncCycleEnabled $false
Import-Module 'C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure AD Sync\Extensions\AADConnector.psm1'
Set-ADSyncAADConnectorExportApiVersion 2
Set-ADSyncAADConnectorImportApiVersion 2
set-ADSyncScheduler -SyncCycleEnabled $True

Azure AD Connect v2 endpoint

In the first screenshot you can also see the Azure AD Password Protection proxy. This was installed on December 17, 2019 and the version installed is 1.2.125.0. This is also the latest version, which you can check on Azure AD Password Protection agent version history.

The Azure AD Password Protection proxy also supports auto upgrade, you can check the settings using the Get-AzureADPasswordProtectionProxyConfiguration cmdlet on the Azure AD Connect server.

More information

Upgrade Azure Connect

Although it is possible to auto-upgrade your Azure AD Connect server, not all releases are available through the auto-upgrade mechanism.

The current version of Azure AD Connect is 1.4.38.0, released on December 9, 2019 and is not available through auto-upgrade for example. The version on my Azure AD connect server is 1.4.18.0. You can easily check this in Control Panel | Programs | Programs and Features.

Azure AD Connect 1.4.18.0

For the version release history of Azure AD Connect check this page: Azure AD Connect: Version release history.

Upgrading is easy, download the latest version from Microsoft Azure Active Directory Connect download page and start the downloaded Windows installer package. When the Upgrade Azure Active Directory Connect window appears, click Upgrade and follow the wizard.

Upgrade Azure AD Connect

Enter the global tenant admin password in the Connect to Azure AD window, click Next and the Ready to Configure window appears.

Start the synchronization process when configuration completes

It will upgrade the Azure AD synchronization configuration and it will enable auto-upgrade. If needed, you can uncheck the start the synchronization process when configuration completes checkbox, this way you can make manual changes before synchronization start.

Click Upgrade and with 2 minutes the upgrade is finished, and synchronization will resume.

 

Exchange 2016 CU9 and Exchange 2013 CU20 released

On March 20, 2018 Microsoft has released two new quarterly updates:

  • Exchange 2016 Cumulative Update 9 (CU9)
  • Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 20 (CU20)

There aren’t too many new features in these CUs. The most important ‘feature’ is that TLS 1.2 is now fully supported (most likely you already have TLS 1.2 only on your load balancer). This is extremely supported since Microsoft will support TLS 1.2 ONLY in Office 365 in the last quarter of this year (see the An Update on Office 365 Requiring TLS 1.2 Microsoft blog as well).

Support for .NET Framework 4.7.1, or the ongoing story about the .NET Framework. The .NET Framework 4.7.1 is fully supported by Exchange 2016 CU9 and Exchange 2013 CU20. Why is this important? For the upcoming CUs in three months (somewhere in June 2018) the .NET Framework 4.7.1 is mandatory, so you need these to be installed in order to install these upcoming CUs.

Please note that .NET Framework 4.7 is NOT supported!

If you are currently running an older CU of Exchange, for example Exchange 2013 CU12, you have to make an intermediate upgrade to Exchange 2013 CU15. Then upgrade to .NET Framework 4.6.2 and then upgrade to Exchange 2013 CU20. If you are running Exchange 2016 CU3 or CU4, you can upgrade to .NET Framework 4.6.2 and then upgrade to Exchange 2016 CU9.

Schema changes

If you are coming from a recent Exchange 2013 CU, there are no schema changes since the schema version (rangeUpper = 15312) hasn’t changed since Exchange 2013 CU7. However, since there can be changes in (for example) RBAC, it’s always a good practice to run the Setup.exe /PrepareAD command. For Exchange 2016, the schema version (rangeUpper = 15332) hasn’t changed since Exchange 2016 CU7.

As always, check the new CUs in your lab environment before installing into your production environment. If you are running Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016 in a DAG, use the PowerShell commands as explained in my earlier EXCHANGE 2013 CU17 AND EXCHANGE 2016 CU6 blog.

More information and downloads

A reboot is required to complete file operations on ‘exchangeserver.msi’

I already mentioned this in my blogpost about Exchange 2016 CU6 and Exchange 2013 CU17, but when upgrading an existing Exchange 2016 server to Exchange 2016 CU6, the setup application stops after step 5, 6 or 7 (random) with the following error message:

“A reboot is required to complete file operations on ‘E:\exchangeserver.msi’. Reboot the machine, and then run setup again”

image

After rebooting and restarting the setup application the upgrade finishes successfully.

Rebooting the Exchange 2016 server prior to starting the upgrade process does not prevent this from happening. Also, there’s no difference between Exchange running on Windows 2012 R2 or Windows 2016.

The installation process has been tested by Microsoft and TAP customers, and tests are still conducted. It is somewhat clear what the root cause is for this issue, it is an MSI package that’s causing this issue. Please be aware that the Microsoft setup application executes around 200 MSI packages, and if only one MSI package is having difficulties you can see issues like this. Because of the number of MSI packages it is not possible to check in advance if your server will experience this issue.

At this moment the only solution is to reboot the server when requested and restart the application program.