Tag Archives: Exchange Online

Connecting to remote server outlook.office365.com failed

In a previous blog I explained how to enable MFA for Admin accounts. This is a great security solution, but unfortunately it breaks Remote PowerShell for Exchange Online.
When you try to connect to Exchange Online using the following commands:

$Cred= Get-Credential
$Session= New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/PowerShell-LiveID -Credential $Cred -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection

It fails with the following error message:

New-PSSession : [outlook.office365.com] Connecting to remote server outlook.office365.com failed with the following error message : Access is denied. For more information, see the about_Remote_Troubleshooting Help topic.
At line:1 char:11
+ $Session= New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -Connec …
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ CategoryInfo : OpenError: (System.Manageme….RemoteRunspace:RemoteRunspace) [New-PSSession], PSRemotingTransportException
+ FullyQualifiedErrorId : AccessDenied,PSSessionOpenFailed

As shown in the following screenshot:

connecting-failed

To overcome this issue, Microsoft has a special Exchange Online PowerShell module that supports Multi Factor Authentication. You can download this from the Exchange Admin Center in Exchange Online by selecting hybrid in the navigation pane as shown in the following screenshot:

MFA-Portal

Click Configure followed by Open to download and start the setup application. Click Install to continue. The Exchange Online PowerShell module will be automatically installed in seconds and when finished it will automatically open a PowerShell window as shown in the following screenshot:

EXO-PSSession

You can now use the Get-EXOPSSession -UserPrincipalName admin@tenant.onmicrosoft.com command to logon to Remote PowerShell. A separate windows will be opened requesting your tenant credentials, followed by the MFA option you’ve configured.

If all is entered correctly the Remote PowerShell for Exchange Online is opened with MFA enabled.

 

Cannot find a recipient that has mailbox GUID when moving from Exchange Online to Exchange 2016

When moving mailboxes from Exchange Online to Exchange 2016 on-premises in a hybrid environment, the move fails with an error “Cannot find a recipient that has mailbox GUID ‘ ‘

image

The error is listed here for Search Engine purposes:

Error: MigrationPermanentException: Cannot find a recipient that has mailbox GUID ‎’add02766-9698-48e6-9234-91c3077137bc’. –> Cannot find a recipient that has mailbox GUID ‎ add02766-9698-48e6-9234-91c3077137bc ‎’.
Report: bramwess@exchangelabs.nl

When checking the user account with ADSI Edit in the on-premises Active Directory it is obvious that this property is empty:

image

When checking the Mailbox in Exchange Online (using Remote PowerShell) the Exchange GUID is visible when using the command

Get-Mailbox -Identity name@exchangelabs.nl | Select Name,*GUID*

As shown in the following screenshot:

image

It took me some time to figure out why this property was empty. Normally when moving mailboxes from Exchange on-premises to Exchange Online the Mailbox GUID is retained. Keeping the Mailbox GUID makes sure you don’t have to download the .OST file again after moving to Exchange Online.

What happened here is that the user was created in Active Directory on-premises, and a Mailbox was directly created in Exchange Online using the Enable-RemoteMailbox command. In this scenario, there never was a Mailbox on-premises and thus never a Mailbox GUID.

The solution is to copy and paste the Mailbox Guid as found in the previous command into the Remote Mailbox object on-premises using the Set-RemoteMailbox command

Set-RemoteMailbox user@exchangelabs.nl -ExchangeGuid “copied value”

As shown in the following screenshot:

image

When setting the Mailbox Guid the mailbox can be moved from Exchange Online to Exchange on-premises.

Ps. Don’t forget to repeat this for anchive mailbox (if one exists)

MigrationTransientException: Target database GUID cannot be used (Mailbox database size limits in Exchange Online)

If you are designing Exchange 2016 (or have been designing Exchange 2013) environment you are aware of the The Exchange 2016 Preferred Architecture (https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/exchange/2015/10/12/the-exchange-2016-preferred-architecture/) and articles like Ask the Perf Guy: How big is too BIG? (https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/exchange/2015/06/19/ask-the-perf-guy-how-big-is-too-big/) which explain pretty much how to design an Exchange solid (and large) Exchange environment.

When it comes to Mailbox databases, the recommended size limit for non-replicated databases is 200GB and for replicated databases 2 TB (when running 3 or 4 copies of a Mailbox database).

One can only guess how Microsoft has designed their Exchange servers in Exchange Online, but we can assume that the Preferred Architecture is written with their Exchange Online experiences in mind.

Sometimes error messages that are generated in Exchange Online can reveal more information. While moving mailboxes from Exchange 2010 to Exchange Online in a hybrid configuration the following error message was returned in a migration batch for a number of Mailbox databases:

Error: MigrationTransientException: Target database ‎’07bdf507-ab94-479b-aeb6-1bfef1458c4c‎’ cannot be used: Current database file size: 1502835900416 Current space available inside database: 100237312 Allowed database growth percentage: 90 Maximum database file size limit: 1622722691784 Is database excluded from provisioning: ‎’False‎’. –> Target database ‎’07bdf507-ab94-479b-aeb6-1bfef1458c4c‎’ cannot be used: Current database file size: 1502835900416 Current space available inside database: 100237312 Allowed database growth percentage: 90 Maximum database file size limit: 1622722691784 Is database excluded from provisioning: ‎’False‎’.

Obviously it’s telling us the migration cannot proceed since the target Mailbox (in Exchange Online!) has reached its size limit. The following sizes are reported:

  • Current database file size: 1502835900416 (1,502,835,900,416 bytes, approx. 1.5TB)
  • Current space available inside database: 100237312 (100.237.312 bytes, approx. 100MB)
  • Maximum database file size limit: 1622722691784 (1.622.722.691.784 bytes, approx. 1.6 TB)

So, the maximum size limit for Exchange 2016 in Exchange is not really used in Exchange Online, but it’s getting close, which is interesting to see.

What I don’t understand is why this issue occurs in the first place. To me it looks like a failing part in the provisioning service but I have to admit I’ve never seen this before in the last couple of years so I expect it’s only one Exchange server that’s failing here.

Exchange Online PowerShell multi factor authentication (MFA)

It’s a good thing to enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) for Office 365 administrators. For web based management portals this is not a problem, just enter your username and password, wait for the text message to arrive, enter it in the additional dialog box and you’re in.

For PowerShell this has been more difficult, but MFA for PowerShell is available as well for some time now. When you login to the Exchange Admin Center and select hybrid in the navigation pane you can configure a hybrid environment (first option) or install and configure the Exchange Online PowerShell MFA module.

Click on the second configure button, and in the pop-up box that appears click Open to start the installation of the PowerShell module:

image

Continue reading Exchange Online PowerShell multi factor authentication (MFA)

Moving from Exchange 2010 to Office 365 Part II

In my previous blogpost, I’ve discussed the prerequisites for moving from Exchange 2010 to Office 365 when using Directory Synchronization (using Azure AD Connect). In this blogpost I’ll discuss how to create an Exchange 2010 hybrid environment.

Exchange 2010 Hybrid

Now that Directory Synchronization is in place using Azure AD Connect we can focus on connecting the on-premises Exchange environment to Exchange Online, this a called an Exchange Hybrid Configuration.

Hybrid configurations can consist of Exchange 2010, Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016 or a combination of versions, so it is possible to have an Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013 coexistence scenario on-premises, and connect this to Exchange Online. However, when using multiple versions of Exchange in a Hybrid configuration there’s always add complexity, and when configured incorrectly you can get unexpected results. Therefore, I typically recommend using only one version, so if you’re running Exchange 2010 on-premises, there’s no need to add an Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016 server to your configuration, just as a ‘hybrid server’. Despite what other people tell you, there’s no need to add a newer version, and Exchange 2010 Hybrid is fully supported by Microsoft. Better is to create an Exchange 2010 hybrid environment, and when the mailboxes (or most the mailboxes) are moved to Office 365 upgrade your existing Exchange 2010 environment to Exchange 2016. But that might be an interesting topic for a future blog post Smile.

Basically, we will create the following configuration (again, there is no Exchange 2016 server installed in the existing organization):

image

Figure 14. Exchange 2010 hybrid configuration.

Continue reading Moving from Exchange 2010 to Office 365 Part II