Tag Archives: Exchange 2016

Setting Calendar permissions right after mailbox creation

Customer is running Exchange 2013 with approx. 2500 mailboxes. When looking at calendars and sharing information through the availability service only the availability (free, busy or tentative) is shown. No details are shown by default.

Customer now request to publish more information so that users that want to schedule a meeting can see the details of other user’s appointments. This should not only be configured for existing users, but new users should receive this setting directly when provisioned.

For example, when configuring this for a user called Kim Akers (kima@exchangelabs.nl) for all users you can use the following Exchange PowerShell command:

Set-MailboxFolderPermission kima:\Calendar -User Default -AccessRights Reviewer

When scheduling a meeting with Kim Akers I can now see her appointment details in Outlook, and I can open the appointment to see all details (read-only) of this appointment as shown in the following two screenshots:

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Note. Check the Set-MailboxFolderPermission article on Microsoft TechNet for all details regarding the permissions that can be assigned.

Continue reading Setting Calendar permissions right after mailbox creation

Cisco IronPort and Exchange 2016

If you have been following my blogs over the years you should be aware that I’ve always been using Exchange Edge Transport servers in front of my Mailbox servers for message hygiene purposes. My last (well known) environment looked like this:

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There are two Mailbox servers (Exchange 2013 and Exchange 2016) and two Edge Transport servers (also Exchange 2013 and Exchange 2016). MX records point to both Edge Transport servers and there are two Edge Synchronizations. And the Edge Transport servers were capable for DKIM signing (as posted in a previous blogpost), but lacked DKIM verification and DMARC validation.

The most important part in the Edge Transport server is the Real Time Blocklist, configured to use Spamhaus for connection filtering. While this works pretty well (there still is quite some spam that gets delivered into mailboxes) there is always room for improvement. I have been looking at cloud solution, but they didn’t always deliver what was expected.

A couple of my customers are using Cisco Email Security Appliance (previously known as IronPort) solutions on-premises and are happy with it, so time to start testing a Cisco Email Security Appliance (ESA) in my own environment. Continue reading Cisco IronPort and Exchange 2016

Exchange 2016, backup and recovery databases

Last week I got a request from a customer. A long time ago I posted a blogpost on Exchange 2010 recovery databases, but after the customer migrated to Exchange 2016 his procedure around recovery databases didn’t work anymore. His request was basically to rewrite my blogpost.

For this blogpost I have a pretty simple Exchange 2016 Mailbox server, configured with one Mailbox database which is stored on a dedicated disk, and I’m using Windows Server Backup to backup the entire Mailbox database disk (VSS full backup).

Don’t pay too much attention to the naming of my Exchange server and the Mailbox database I’m using here. In fact, this is an Exchange 2016 hybrid server I’m misusing for the purpose of this blog Smile

Recovery database

You can restore a mailbox database to its original location and mount again, but you can also use a Recovery Database to restore and recover your data. A recovery database is a mailbox database that can be mounted on your Exchange server, but it is not visible for regular users but only for the Exchange administrator. The Exchange administrator can access this recovery database and recover data, for example create a PST of a particular mailbox in this database.

When restoring a database from backup, select the restore option and follow the wizard. When you reach the Select Recovery Type window select Applications as shown in the following screenshot.

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Continue reading Exchange 2016, backup and recovery databases

Updated Exchange Server Role Requirements Calculator

The Exchange Server Role Requirements Calculator which you need for designing a proper Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016 on-premises environment has been updates, currently the calculator is at version 8.4.

Some new functionality is added to this version:

  • Added support for ReplayLagMaxDelay
  • Added support for SafetyNetHoldTime in CreateDAG.ps1

And seven bug fixes in this version:

  • Improved the DAG auto-calculation results display to highlight deployment configuration in both datacenters
  • Fixed an issue that prevented DAG auto-calculation in single site DAG deployments
  • Fixed a SPECInt2006 validation issue with DAG auto-calculation
  • Fixed a bug with the DAG auto-calculation with Active/Passive deployments
  • Fixed conditional formatting issues with the transaction log table
  • Removed data validation from certain unused cells on the Input tab
  • Fixed bug in calcNumActiveDBsSF formula

The requirements calculator can be downloaded here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Exchange-2013-Server-Role-f8a61780

More information:

Exchange 2016 CU4

On Tuesday december 13, 2016 Microsoft has released its quaterly updates:

and Update Rollups:

Looking at Exchange 2016, what does this CU bring us?

There are minor changes to the user interface of Outlook on the Web or Outlook Web App, whatever you may call it. It’s not that dramatically, the formatting controls have been moved to the bottom of the frame containing the editing pane, as can be seen on the following screenshot.

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And finally, there’s support for the .NET Framework 4.6.2. Using .NET Framework 4.6.2 is still optional (but recommended), but the upcoming release in March 2017 (Exchange 2016 CU5) will require the use of .NET Framework 4.6.2.

As you might have noticed, Exchange 2016 CU3 (the previous release) introduced support for Windows Server 2016. This was also announced at the Ignite 2016 in Atlanta. Unfortunately there was a major flaw in Windows 2016 clustering that caused issues with Exchange 2016 in a Database Availability Group configuration. This has now been fixed by the Windows team (KB3206632), and Exchange 2016 again fully supports Windows 2016. The hotfix is mentioned is mandatory, and the setup application does a check for this hotfix.

Exchange 2016 does not introduce any new schema changes, but you may execute setup.exe /prepareAD /IAcceptExchangeServerLicenseTerms to make sure any changes in the configuration partition are applied successfully.

As usual, and especially after the latest issues with Exchange 2016 CU3 and Windows 2016 I strongly encourage everybody to thoroughly test Exchange 2016 CU4 (or any other update that’s needed of course) in your lab environment before bringing it into production!