Category Archives: Security

Self Service Password Reset in Office 365

One option, not only for security, but also for user convenience is Self Service Password Reset (SSPR). This feature enables cloud users to reset their own passwords in Azure Active Directory, and this way they don’t have to contact the local IT staff with reset password questions.

Note. For Self Service Password Reset you need an additional Azure AD Basic license.

To enable Self Service Password Reset, logon to the Azure Portal (https://portal.azure.com) as a Global Administrator. Select Azure Active Directory, select Password Reset and in the actions pane, select Selected or All. Using the Selected option, you can enable SSPR only to member of the security group SSPRSecurityGroupUsers for a more targeted approach. Of course, if you want to enable SSPR for all your users you should select the All option.

Password-Reset-Selected

Click Save to store your selection. Click the second option Authentication Methods to select the number of methods available to your users. In my example, I’m going to select just one, and options I select are Email and Mobile Phone.

Methods_Available

Click Save to continue. The last step is to configure the registration. This is to require users to register when signing in, and the number of days the users are asked to re-confirm their authentication information, as shown in the following screenshot:

password-reset-registration

You’re all set now.

When a (new) user logs on now, he is presented with a pop-up, asking for verification methods. As configured earlier the authentication phone and authentication email is used. The mobile phone number that’s presented here was configured earlier in Azure Active Directory when provisioning the user. Click Verify and you’ll receive a text message with a verification code.

You can chose an email address for authentication purposes, as long as it’s not an email address in your own tenant. Follow the wizard when you click Set it up now as shown in the following screenshot.

dont-lose-access

To test the SSPR, use the browser van navigate to https://passwordreset.microsoftonline.com/, enter your userID (UPN) and enter the CAPTCHA code.

You can choose to send an email to your verification account, send a text message to your mobile phone (see screenshot below) or have Microsoft call you.

Get-Back-Into-Your-Account

Enter your phone number (the phone number that’s also registered in Azure AD) and within seconds you’ll receive a verification text message. After entering this code you can enter a new password, and with this new password you can login again.

As a bonus you’ll receive an email that you password has been changed.

Summary

In this blogpost I’ve shown you how to implement the Self Service Password Reset (SSRP), a feature that’s available in the default Office 365 Enterprise licenses, so no additional Azure AD licenses are needed. You can choose to implement text messages or email messages (as shown in this blogpost) but you can also implement additional security questions.

Now this is a nice solution for cloud identities, but it does not work for synced identities or federated identities. For this to work you need to implement password write-back, a nice topic for the next blog 😊

Multi Factor Authentication MFA in Office 365 for Admin Accounts

The last thing you want to happen is when your (global) admin accounts are compromised. One easy way to avoid this is to enable multi factor authentication or MFA for you tenant admin accounts.

To achieve this, go to the Office 365 admin center and select the active users. Click More and select Multifactor Authentication setup as shown below:

Active_Users

You’ll see a list of all users in your organization that have MFA enabled. If this is the first time you’re here, most likely all users will have MFA set to disabled.

To show only the Global Administrators select Global Administrators in the View dropdown box. Select the Global Administrator and select Enable under Quick Steps.

MFA_Enable

Continue reading Multi Factor Authentication MFA in Office 365 for Admin Accounts

Microsoft Secure Score – Improve security of your tenant

During Ignite 2018 in Orlando there was a lot of focus on security in Office 365 and Azure Active Directory. That makes sense, a cloud solution is accessible for everyone. Not only your own internal users, but also the bad guys that are out for your data, accounts or money. And not only your user accounts are at risk, your admin accounts even more, and when losing your admin accounts, you are pretty much out of business.

It was shocking to hear that there are 6,000 compromised admin accounts each month, and only 4% of all admin accounts have MFA enabled. And the number of compromised admin accounts decreases with 99,9% with MFA enabled. Go figure!

Other issues that impact security negatively is weak passwords. Everybody knows about brute force attacks, but ever heard of password spray attacks? Based on user lists and (default) weak passwords all combinations of usernames and passwords are tried, without you as an admin even knowing what’s going on.

The list with security issues is impressive…. Weak (legacy) authentication, no password changes, phishing attacks, spoofing, auto-forwarding, too many global admins, permissions and roles, unmanaged devices, etc. etc.

Continue reading Microsoft Secure Score – Improve security of your tenant

Exchange 2010 and TLS 1.2

In a previous blogpost I discussed an issue I had with Outlook 2010 and TLS 1.2. At the same time this reminded me that Microsoft will remove support for TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1 in Office 365 on October 31, 2018 as communicated in https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4057306/preparing-for-tls-1-2-in-office-365. This means that when you have communication issues with Office 365 because of an older and weaker protocol, you won’t get any support. Time to do some research….

Existing Exchange 2010 environment

As you may have seen on this side, I still am a big fan of Exchange 2010 and also have an pure Exchange 2010 hybrid environment up-and-running and it looks like this:

Inframan-hybrid

MX records is pointing to my Exchange 2010 Edge Transport Server (running on Windows 2008 R2), webmail and Autodiscover are routed via an F5 LTM load balancer to an Exchange 2010 CAS/HUB/Mailbox server (also running on Windows 2008 R2), and hybrid is configured directly on Exchange 2010 (for hybrid mail flow I’m using a separate FQDN, o365mail.inframan.nl) without any Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016 server.

So, how do you test which TLS version is used by your Exchange 2010 server? In Exchange 2010 this should be done using the protocol logfiles. Message headers in Exchange 2010 do not contain enough information for showing this TLS information. So, you must enable protocol logging for the appropriate Receive Connectors and Send Connectors. In my environment this means the Default Receive Connector on the Exchange 2010 Edge Transport server (for O365 traffic from other tenants), the Default-First-Site-Name to Internet Send Connector, and both connectors between the Exchange 2010 server and Office 365 for hybrid. Analyzing the protocol logfiles can best be done in Excel (import as CSV files). When analyzing, look for a string like TLS protocol SP_PROT_TLS1_0_SERVER (when receiving) or TLS protocol SP_PROT-TLS1_0_CLIENT (when sending). When TLS 1.2 is used, look for a string like TLS protocol SP_PROT_TLS1_2_SERVER and TLS protocol SP_PROT-TLS1_2_CLIENT.

Continue reading Exchange 2010 and TLS 1.2

Ignite 2018 – Azure AD and security sessions

A little later than originally planned because of an unexpected visit of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston on my way…. In my previous postings I blogged about the start of the conference and some of the Exchange sessions I attended in the first two days. Now how much I do love Exchange, most of my clients are moving towards Office 365 and Exchange Online, so what else is important here?

Yes, authentication! Azure Active Directory, Identity and Access Management and security around these solutions. And this happens to be important for Exchange and Exchange Online as well, so….

Secure access to Office 365/Azure Active Directory with new features in AD FS in Windows Server 2019 and Azure AD Password Protection

Sessions “BRK3226 – Secure access to Office 365/Azure Active Directory with new features in AD FS in Windows Server 2019 and Azure AD Password Protection” is all about authentication in Azure AD. It explains the traditional password hash sync as well as the ADFS options (more that 71 million users are actively using ADFS). But there are also 1.29 billion authentications blocked in August 2018 and 81% of all security breaches are because of weak, default or stolen passwords.

securing-resources

Common passwords used in (Azure) AD are Password, Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter, 2018, 1234, your favorite football team etc. And these in turn are used in password spray attacks! Also vulnerable are passwords where number and letters are changed, for example “I” becomes “!”, “O” becomes “0” etc. And now you wonder, how many of my users are doing this? Password protection in Azure AD also includes normalization of the password, so these changes are automatically blocked. The good thing is, Azure AD password protection is coming to on-premises AD as well!

You can find the presentation on Youtube https://youtu.be/DC4cyF_JEgw and the presentation can be found here https://mediusprodstatic.studios.ms/presentations/Ignite2018/BRK3226.pptx

Azure Active Directory best practices from around the world

The title of the session was renamed to “Azure AD: Do’s and Don’ts”, but this is a more ‘notes from the field’ session with a lot of practical information around Azure AD, legacy authentication, modern authentication, Hybrid Azure AD Joine (HAADJ, I hate 3 letter acronyms, let alone 5 letter versions 😊) and what to do to get a better and more safe authentication experience.

legacy-authentication

Interesting in this presentation is that is also discusses what step you need to take to move from legacy authentication to modern authentication, and also the pitfalls you might encounter, including links to more information (found in the presentation).

associating-devices

You can see the presentation on Youtube https://youtu.be/wGk0J4z90GI and you can find the presentation here https://mediusprodstatic.studios.ms/presentations/Ignite2018/BRK3408.pptx

Scott Schnoll’s Exchange and Office 365 tips and tricks

I don’t know how many times Scott Schnoll has delivered this session, but it still is an awesome session and contains so much practical information around Exchange and nowadays Exchange Online.

scott-schnoll

I tried to make some pictures with Office Lens, but I think the color of the slides and text are not identified correctly so they are horrible. The slides aren’t available (yet), so you have to check the presentation on Youtube: https://youtu.be/0WNMX8EKYZk

Topics include anti-virus exclusions, DMARC enhancements, decommission on-premises Exchange in (or after) hybrid, changes to EOP IP ranges, migrating DL’s to Office 365 (including a script to do so), a license administrator in Office 365 (preview), DLP and credit card numbers and Mail Flow Insights, a new tool/dashboard that is currently being developed. Scott is doing a demo on this at the end of his presentation. Very cool, very promising, very useful!

Summary

So, after 5 days (well, four and a half days) we can say it was a very successful event. It is so huge, approx. 30,000 attendees from 5,000 organizations. So many sessions, break-out, theatre, workshop, hands-on, almost too much. And the sheer size of the location, I guess one can walk between 6 and 7 miles every day between the various locations. Would I go again? Sure, next year, again in Orlando, November 4-8. Hope to see you there!

More information/sessions

And some more interesting sessions to view online….

BRK2407 – Windows 10 and Office 365 ProPlus lifecycle and servicing update (CONDENSED)

https://mediusprodstatic.studios.ms/presentations/Ignite2018/BRK2407.pptx  https://youtu.be/t9Bs55czc1E

BRK3234 – An IT pros guide to Open ID Connect, OAuth 2.0 with the V1 and V2 Azure Active Directory endpoints (very informative, but not available online yet I’m afraid)

BRK3397 – Protect and control your sensitive emails with Office 365 Message Encryption

https://mediusprodstatic.studios.ms/presentations/Ignite2018/BRK3397.pptx

https://youtu.be/Ld4b4pFua0g

BRK3408 – Azure Active Directory best practices from around the world

https://mediusprodstatic.studios.ms/presentations/Ignite2018/BRK3226.pptx

https://youtu.be/wGk0J4z90GI

BRK3146 – What’s amazing and new in calendaring in Outlook!

https://youtu.be/-ZrNTylawOA

THR3024 – How to add MFA to your Exchange Online/on-premises mailboxes in 20 minutes or less

https://youtu.be/7hoEmEwV8Rk

BRK3081 – Implementing a modern network architecture to get the most out of Office 365

https://youtu.be/FGMzS_MjuPY

BRK3145 – Deploying Outlook mobile securely in the enterprise

https://youtu.be/4mHlxdJMh1Q

THR3036 – Azure Active Directory hybrid identity and banned password detection

https://youtu.be/kuVkfIiapI4