Tag Archives: HCW

Remove Exchange Hybrid Configuration

After decommissioning the Resource Forest I still have an Exchange 2016 environment on-premises, but all my mailboxes are in Office 365. Users are provisioned in Active Directory, Remote Mailboxes are provisioned in Exchange 2016 and everything is synchronized to Office 365 using Azure AD Connect.

Do I still need an Exchange Hybrid Configuration? Unless there are plans to move resources back to Exchange on-premises there’s no need for a Hybrid Configuration. To stay in a supported configuration, an Exchange server on-premises is still needed for management purposes, but only Azure AD Connect is needed and not a full hybrid configuration.

Note. If you want to use the on-premises Exchange server for SMTP relay purposes you don’t need the Hybrid configuration either. Just make sure you have a SMTP Send Connector that points to Exchange Online Protection and you’re good.

Removing the Hybrid configuration consists of the following steps:

  • Disable Autodiscover SCP in Exchange
  • Remove the Hybrid Configuration from Active Directory
  • Remove Connectors in Exchange Online
  • Remove the Organization Sharing from Exchange Online
  • Disable OAuth

Disable Autodiscover SCP in Exchange

When all Exchange resources are in Exchange Online you no longer need the on-premises Service Connection Points (SCP) for Autodiscover. But make sure you have the correct CNAME records for Autodiscover that point to Autodiscover.outlook.com.

To disable the SCP records in Active Directory, execute the following command in Exchange Management Shell:

Get-ClientAccessServer | Set-ClientAccessServer -AutoDiscoverServiceInternalUri $Null

Remove the Hybrid Configuration from Active Directory

Removing the Hybrid Configuration from Active Directory is just one PowerShell command in Exchange Management Shell:

Remove-HybridConfiguration -Confirm:$false

There’s one pitfall here, this will also remove the outbound to Office 365 Send Connector from Exchange. If you want to keep SMTP relay from on-premises to your mailboxes in Exchange Online you have to manually recreate this connector (use yourdomain-com.mail.protection.outlook.com as a smarthost for this)

Remove Connectors in Exchange Online

In the Exchange Online Admin Center, remove the outbound SMTP connectors that point from Exchange Online to your on-premises Exchange organization. If you want to keep SMTP routing, keep the inbound SMTP connector, otherwise you can remove this as well.

Remove the Organization Sharing from Exchange Online
To remove the Hybrid Organization Sharing from Exchange Online navigate to Organization | Sharing in the Exchange Admin Center and remove the organization sharing.

Disable OAuth on-premises

When used before you can disable the OAuth configuration as well from Exchange on-premises and Exchange Online.

In Exchange on-premises Management Shell, execute the following command:

Get-intraOrganizationConnector | Set-IntraOrganizationConnector -Enabled $False

And to do this in Exchange Online Management Shell, execute the following (same) command:

Get-IntraorganizationConnector | Set-IntraOrganizationConnector -Enabled $False

These are the steps needed to remove the Hybrid Configuration from your Exchange environment.

Note. Microsoft recommends to leave the Exchange Hybrid option in Azure AD Connect.

Summary

In this blogpost I explained how to remove the Hybrid Configuration from your Exchange environment after you have moved all resources to Exchange Online.

The on-premises Exchange server is still needed for management purposes. After removing the Hybrid Configuration you can still manage your recipient Exchange Online using the on-premises Exchange server, all changes are replicated through Azure Active Directory.

Is that last Exchange server on-premises still needed? Yes, you need it for managing your recipients in Exchange Online. When you have Azure AD Connect running in your environment, the objects are managed in on-premises Active Directory. The source of authority is Active Directory. As long as Microsoft hasn’t fixed the source of authority problem, an Exchange server on-premises is still needed.

Moving from Exchange 2010 to Office 365 Part III

Exchange 2010 hybrid and Edge Transport Server

In two previous blog posts I explained how to setup an Exchange 2010 hybrid environment. In these blog posts I used the Exchange 2010 (multi-role) server for the hybrid configuration, so both the Exchange Web Services (used for free/busy, Mailbox Replication Service, OOF, mail tips) and the SMTP connection between Exchange Online and Exchange 2010.

Now that Exchange 2010 end of support is getting closer (less than a year!) I get more questions regarding the move from Exchange 2010 to Exchange Online. And several questions include the use of an Exchange 2010 Edge Transport server in front of the Exchange 2010 multi-role server.

This configuration will look something like this:

exchange 2010 hybrid edge transport

Inbound mail from Internet is getting through Exchange Online Protection and when the mailbox is still on Exchange 2010 it is routed via the Edge Transport Server to the internal Exchange organization. Outbound mail is leaving the organization via the Edge Transport server or via Exchange Online Protection, depending of the location of the mailbox.

The challenge when configuring this in Exchange 2010 is shown in the following screenshot:

missing edge transport server

Compared to running the HCW on Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016 there’s no option to configure the Edge Transport server for secure mail transport in Exchange 2010!!
The only option right now is to run the Hybrid Configuration Wizard, configure it using the Client Access and Mailbox servers option, but use the data for the Edge Transport where needed.

So, run the Hybrid Configuration Wizard, and when you need to enter the public IP address of the transport servers, enter the Public IP address of the Edge Transport server and not the public IP address of the load balancer VIP pointing to the Exchange 2010 internal servers). In my environment, the webmail.inframan.nl points to 176.62.196.253 and the Edge Transport Server smtphost.inframan.nl points to 176.62.196.245. This is the IP address I am going to use as shown in the following screenshot:

hcw public ip address

The next step is to select the certificate that’s used on the Edge Transport Server. By default, the HCW will only look at the internal Exchange 2010 server, so it won’t find any certificate installed on the Edge Transport server. To overcome this, I have imported the certificate of the Edge Transport Server in the certificate store of the internal Exchange 2010 server used by the HCW. In the HWC, click on the drop down box and select the certificate of the Edge Transport server, in my environment the smtphost.inframan.nl certificate:

hcw loading certificates

The last step is where the FQDN of the organization needs to be entered. I have a lot of discussion here because most admins want to enter something like ‘hybrid.domain.com’, but the FQDN of the transport server needs to be entered here, so in my environment this is the FQDN of the Edge Transport Server, i.e. smtphost.inframan.nl. This FQDN is used (together with the certificate information) to create a Send Connector from Exchange Online to the Edge Transport server.

hcw organization fqdn

Finish the Hybrid Configuration Wizard. It will be configured in Exchange 2010 and in Exchange Online and after a short time you can close the HCW:

hcw configure organization relationship

Now, when looking at the Exchange Management Console you can see the Send Connector from Exchange 2010 to Exchange Online. It is configured with the FQDN smtphost.inframan.nl as expected, but the source server of the Send Connector is still the internal Hub Transport server as shown in the following screen shot:

outbound to office 365 connector

Remove the Hub Transport server entry and add the Edge Transport server instead. If you have an Edge Synchronization in place you will see it immediately when you click the Add button.

In Exchange Online, the Receive Connector that’s created will check for any certificate with a wildcard like name, so the smtphost.inframan.nl certificate will automatically be accepted. The Send Connector is also created correctly. The FQDN of the Edge Transport server is used as the server to route message to, and the CN of the certificate that was selected in the HCW is also configured as shown in the following screenshot:

office 365 send connector certificate

We’re almost there. The only thing that needs to be done is to configure the Receive Connector on the Edge Transport Server for TLS from Exchange Online. You should have already configured the Edge Transport Server with the correct 3rd party certificate and when setting up an inbound connection it should use the 3rd party certificate. You can test this using the https://checktls.com tool online.

On the Edge Transport server, execute the following command in the Exchange Management Shell:

Get-ReceiveConnector "smtphost\Default internal receive connector SMTPHOST" | Set-ReceiveConnector -Fqdn smtphost.inframan.nl -TlsDomainCapabilities mail.protection.outlook.com:AcceptOorgProtocol

This will make sure the cross-premises email will be treated as internal email (SCL=-1). If you omit this step, there’s always the risk the email will be treated as external (I’ve seen SCL=5 in my environment) and will end up in the user’s Junk Email Folder.

Summary

When configuring an Exchange 2010 hybrid configuration it is not possible to configure an Edge Transport Server in the Hybrid Configuration Wizard. It is possible to configure this in the HCW for Exchange 2013 and Exchange 2016, but for Exchange 2010 this needs some manual changes.

In this blogpost I showed you the steps needed to configure an Edge Transport Server for secure messaging between Exchange Online and Exchange 2010. When configured this way cross-premises email will be seen as internal email and thus treated accordingly.

 

The version of the Client Access server selected is not supported

When running the Hybrid Configuration Wizard in an Exchange 2010 environment (I reproduced this with Exchange 2010, but didn’t try this with Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016) the following error message is generated:

unsupported version

The version of the Client Access server selected, <ServerName>, is not supported. Please go back and select a server that is supported or upgrade the server to a supported version. If Exchange Server 2010, please install the wizard on the same machine.

Note. The HCW is not run on the Exchange 2010 since it requires .NET Framework 4.6.2 and this version of .NET Framework is not supported on Exchange 2010. Even worse, I’ve seen issues with Exchange 2010 after installing .NET Framework 4.6.2 so it’s a bad idea after all.

Running Exchange 2010 on a server with .NET Framework 4.5.x installed is fully supported, but the HCW won’t install on such an Exchange 2010 server since HCW depends on .NET Framework 4.6.2 and the following error message is generated:

unable to install or run this application

So, we are in a deadlock situation. HCW requires .NET Framework 4.6.2 which is not supported on the Exchange server, and when running the HCW on a non-Exchange 2010 server with the correct version of .NET Framework it fails with an error message.

We have been working with Microsoft CSS (product support) on this case. While it should be fixed in the HCW in the first place, under supervision of CSS the following workaround is available.

If you have HCW open and face this error, press F12 and a few other options appear as can be seen in the following screenshot:

HCW Error

If you click Open Logging Folder you get to the folder where the HCW Logs are stored. If you open the correct logfile and search for *ERROR* you can find something similar to:

server error

Obviously the HCW does an incorrect version check (at least when not running on the Exchange 2010 server itself) so it stops. Version checking is something that was built recently into the HCW so Microsoft can check for N-2 version of the implemented Exchange version.

Back to the error message, if you click Open Process Folder a new HCW command prompt is opened on the correct location:

HCW Prompt

Now when you start the Hybrid Configuration Wizard from the Command Prompt you can use the /dv switch (Microsoft.Online.CSE.Hybrid.App.exe /dv) and now the HCW will not do a version check and continue running and finish successfully.

Important note. This was done under the supervision of Microsoft CSS and should not be done by customers directly. If you are running into this issue, please contact Microsoft support to get the right support. Before you know things break beyond repair (and beyond support).

More information

Updated: December 6, 2018

 

Hybrid Configuration Wizard diagnostics

Life can be so simple sometimes… learned this nice feature at Microsoft Ignite last week… when running the Hybrid Configuration Wizard (HCW) and you press F12, the diagnostics tools becomes available:

hybrid-diagnostics

You can open the individual directories, open the log file itself or create a support package when you have to contact Microsoft support in case of issues. Very nice and useful!

support-package

 

Hybrid Configuration Wizard won’t start on Windows 2016

This morning I tried to install and run the Hybrid Configuration Wizard on a new Windows 2016 server. Using the regular link https://aka.ms/TAPHCW I saw a message appear at the bottom of the screen, but it disappeared in a blink of the eye.

Most likely you can fiddle around with (security) settings in Internet Explorer, but you can also use a direct link to the Hybrid Configuration Wizard:

https://Aka.ms/hybridwizard

Please start in Internet Explorer since in Edge Chromium it downloads but does not start automatically.

Updated with new link on July 10, 2020.